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why now? i want to share a few things. one is that once we start implementing the law and the mechanisms started falling in place and in the first year we got 1,000 cases nudged and then results. .. the mechanism is one thing. the greeting that oxygen, the way we can breed of the greeting as space for rigging a plan and not be bastrop away. women who complain, stigma and retaliation. that is the part that probably would need to focus on. the other thing i felt was that it was really a universal issue. i, during my struggle in the last ten years, have probably read about every sexual-harassment case. and every country, i went to japan a month ago and there it was everywhere in the public place and offices. so i felt like this is something that we really need to a not divide up the world, and this is the part where women have problems and this is a part of the world that has the outcome. we will need to develop a bond of solidarity. when need to talk about our struggles. countries like pakistan, one case of a gang rape or something happens and then it goes into the media
--from personal grievance to public law". the book describes what happened when 11 women joined the campaign to go into the un only to be attacked by there un managers. the case culminated in legislation by the pakistani parliament in 2000 that make sexual harassment crime. she is the chair person, and human rights and democracy streaming and research on news activism and environment. and based in washington d.c. at the national endowment for democracy. and over red light areas, released by oxford and forgotten cases. and in japanese have become popular among young pakistani women. and the doctorate working at the university of minnesota. please join in welcoming today's guest dr. fouzia saeed. [applause] >> very nice to be here and i look forward to the next hour of engagement with you. if you want to turn this off you can, at least up to the limit. i am going to tell you a story today and the stories in the context of pakistan, about one woman and also celebration of women in pakistan but it resonates universally, goes across borders. this is about a legislation we got in pakistan against sexual
process of the law and end up killing more people than the so-called bad guys. >> ambassador akbar ahmed is a professor of studies. american university for noesseni fellow with the brookings institution, a viti professor formerly served as pakistan high customer to the u.k. and the author of several books. professor come on you the member of a tribe from your country as pakistan? >> guest: >> that is an interesting question. i have a question as an anthropologist it is critical to put out there for the reader so everyone knows. my mother is a baton, my father goes back to the profit in islam and i've always found the two are very interesting in my makeup comes along the one hand there is the person who would want peace and create good will and bring people together and compassion more thoughtful and even more mystical. and sometimes these are conflict and i see this in me. so i found that when i was doing the study i was able to get under the skin of the tribal people because that is also part of my heritage but i could reach beyond that and transcend that to reach out and find ways of b
by will you -- must include the contributions of the transgendered? by law. you will have to have pages on transgendered contributions. people who were crossed over sex, or dressed in the other sex. clothing. isn't that absurd? isn't that totalitarian? i thought the purpose of the textbook was to tell the truth, not make groups feel good. but as i point out in the book, leftism is overwhelmingly rooted in feelings. >> host: dennis prager is the author. "still the best hope" is the name of his recent best seller. louis from florida, you're on the air. you're talking with dennis prager. >> caller: i'd like to ask mr. prayinger and his ilk what he just said about truth, why should people believe the bible when that's the biggest novel ever written? who believes the earth is 5,000 years old? how can you follow a book that tells you the world is 5,000 years old and hisclass commentary about the christian schools and the seminary, how does he say something like that and he wants to be honest? i know this man is a right winger, and he wouldn't fifth credit to anybody, but my main question is,
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4

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